Where we get fit and spin (wool)

Posts tagged ‘slow food’

Sloooow food.

We’ve been warned of the dangers of fast food till we’re bored with it. Judging by how full the parking lots are, it  hasn’t made a dent in people’s eating habits. I’ve recently become even more enamored with slow food. Really slow food. I’ve been making bread using only sourdough starter, and still making my yogurt.

This isn’t going to be a “how-to” post, rather a yes, you can. I realize we are all busy and tired, but these are foods that don’t take a lot of time. Or rather, they do, but not from you. For example, it takes less than a few minutes to feed your starter:

potato sour dough starter

potato starter

Starter

This starter is made from a few table spoons of instant potatoes, sugar and water. It can survive in your fridge or freezer almost indefinitely. You just feed it and it does its own thing.

Sourdough

You use it to make sour dough bread. I’ve been using the recipe it came with (from a friend), and one from the internet, and you don’t have to use yeast. It does take a looong time, but you just put it in a bowl and ignore it. You can start it the night before and it’ll be ready for the second rise when you get up in the morning. I started my last one on a weekday and didn’t have time for it for days, so I put it in the fridge till I was ready for it. sour dough

It did fine.

yogurt being cultured in little glass jars

Yogurt

The yogurt is the same thing. I saved some of the last batch I had made in the freezer. I take a little over a liter of milk, microwave it for 11 minutes till it bubbles, then let it cool to 115/120 degrees. Add some of the frozen yogurt, stir and pour into jars. Put them in my yogurt maker and walk away. This time it took longer. It was yogurt in the morning, but I wanted it thicker, so I went to work and popped them in the fridge when I got home. I drained them after dinner and I was done.

Beans

I also recently read that you don’t have to soak beans before cooking. I tried that, and it’s true. I put them inbeans simmering in the crockpot after dinner, and they were well cooked the next morning. Since beans are such a good food, cooking up a big batch and having them on hand to add to a variety of other foods is a great thing.

Fast Food

Now, in telling you all this, don’t think I hate fast food. I can use my microwave and frying pan to get dinner on the table in 20 minutes. I cook fish straight from the freezer and nuke broccoli and potatoes. Any way you can get tasty healthy food instead of garbage is ok in my book. But if you want fast food all week, take a few minutes here and there to add slow food. Cook a batch of rice while you are eating dinner for the next day. Always through roasted vegetables in with your chicken, make your stove work harder. I don’t think anything’s easier than roasting a whole butternut while my chickens cooking, then I de-bone the chicken and scoop the squash at the same time. Could be then, could be two days later. Make your fridge, freezer, microwave and oven really work for you.

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Making Healthy Cooking Easier and Cheaper

Eating as healthy as possible, as cheaply as possible does require more effort on your part. Here are some of my top thoughts on making it easier. There is a phrase I hear a horse trainer using that applies here:”Make it easy to do the right thing, and hard to do the wrong.” If we make doing some of these things too hard, we won’t do them. The other thing to keep in mind is the “80/20” rule – make 80% of your diet as “clean” as possible, so you can afford the other 20%. So if tonight you have a whole wheat pizza with black bean and salsa topping, it will won’t be so bad that you get your potatoes from a box the next night.

  1. Prepare beans overnight, double batch, freeze half
  2. Cook double portion of brown rice, freeze half
  3. freeze produce, including large amounts from auction or market
  4. Do some of the prep work for tomorrow’s dinner while cleaning up tonight’s
  5. Soup usually makes huge batches, freeze half.
  6. Use tools- food processor, blender, whatever, to make it easier.
  7. Use the microwave as often as possible

I think you can see a trend here. I rely heavily on my freezer, especially since there are only two of us. With the worries about BpA’s in canned food, I’m reluctant to use too many, especially tomatoes, since their acid is more likely to leach the BpA’s out of can’s lining. I have canned my own, and will do so again, but I also dry and freeze a lot.

Of course, all this work fits into my philosophy that it is too much sitting and easy food that led us to where we are now, so reversing that by actually participating in our own food preparation is a good thing. If you have any ideas, tips, favorite recipes or any other tidbits, send them along.

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