Where we get fit and spin (wool)

Posts tagged ‘vegetables’

Laurel’s Rules for Healthy Eating

Normally, I’m not big on “rules”.

However, people seem to like them. I have to admit, I feel so strongly about some things, I would have to almost consider them rules. Here is a list of the “rules” I eat by.

1) The #1 vegetable rule

This one is a no-brainer for me. If possible, I try to make the focus of my meals the vegetables. There is no downside to this. It keeps your weight under control, maximizes your nutrient intake and gives you lots of healthy fiber. In fact, it’s what inspired me to post tonight. I made salmon patties for dinner, and served them with a salad, as well as roasted veggies. Three quarters veggies, one quarter protein. When I successfully follow this rule, we usually have a variety of vegetable dishes at the same meal, making it feel like a feast.

2) Make in bulk to make it easy

Again, going back to tonight’s dinner, I had previously washed and torn a head of romaine lettuce, making it like the bagged stuff in the store. Yesterday, I made a variation on a Caprese salad with tomato, onion, basil and ranch dressing. I took the leftover tomato salad and put it over some of the lettuce, making the easiest salad ever. I cooked up half a head of cabbage while I was cooking the salmon patties, that we can either eat as is, or use for cabbage lasagna or stuffed cabbage. Try and make enough of anything you cook to go for the next meal(s). If you might get sick of it, freeze it.

3) Treat starch like a condiment.

I’m not anti carb, but if it isn’t a vegetable, go lightly. For example, never eat spaghetti without a big salad, and make it a small portion of pasta , same with the meatballs, compensated with lots of sauce, preferably with tomatoes added.

4) Try to make it homemade, or half the portion.

I’m specifically thinking of coleslaw, potato salad or other quasi-healthy foods. The store bought kind are generally swimming in dressing and sparing on the vegetables.

5) One starch per meal.

Many of you might consider this sacrilege, but if you are having pasta, skip the bread. Ditto a potato. In fact, I usually only eat bread if I am having a sandwich or if the bread is the focus of the meal some other way.

6) Go ahead and treat yourself, but be honest.

A treat is something out of the ordinary. It isn’t a treat if you go out to breakfast, then have a desert after lunch. Or if you go out to eat three times a week. An occasional treat won’t mess up your eating, but you have to be honest in the frequency of your treats. If you are going with frequent, they have to be small.

7) Consider the impact of what you are eating.

Sure, we all are influenced by tastes and cravings. But ask yourself, “Is this food going to benefit me, or make me sorry?” Most of us have a good idea of what’s right. Why eat something that you’ll be sorry for? This starts in the store. You can’t succumb to cravings if the junk food isn’t in your house.

I know I focus on food a lot on this blog. As soon as I tell people I’m a personal trainer, the conversation almost always veers towards weight control. The person often justifies their current eating pattern, then complains about their weight. Or, complains about their eating, but then offers reason why they can’t change. This post is incorporating facets of many of those conversations. You have to make consistent choices of what you eat if you want to be healthy. There are no other options.

Does God Care What we Eat?

Alert! For those for whom Christian conversation is offensive, quit reading or be prepared to be offended

From time to time, when I talk about nutrition, I get a backlash of “But who would want to  eat that stuff” or “But I hate vegetables.” I think this is sad. As I am a Christian, I believe food is from God, and how we eat directly is correlated to how God would like us to live. My purpose of this post is to demonstrate that, and to possibly persuade the anti-health food crowd to reconsider.

To begin, God has told us what to eat in His word:

pretty veggiesGe 1:29 ¶ And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for meat.

We were not given meat to eat until after the flood:

Ge 9:1 ¶ And God blessed Noah and his sons, and said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth.

2 The fear of you and the dread of you shall be upon every beast of the earth, and upon every bird of the air, upon everything that creeps on the ground and all the fish of the sea; into your hand they are delivered.

3 Every moving thing that lives shall be food for you; and as I gave you the green plants, I give you everything.

4 Only you shall not eat flesh with its life, that is, its blood.

frighttened lynx

The fear of you and the dread of you shall be upon every beast of the earth.

I would take this to mean that vegetables, nuts, seeds and grains were our original food, later, we added meat. Thus, I would say that the modern injunction to eat mostly plants, but not necessarily to be vegetarian, would be in line with God’s word.

Daniel reemphasizes this with his reluctance to eat the rich food of the king’s court:

Da 1:5 And the king appointed them a daily provision of the king’s meat, and of the wine which he drank: so nourishing them three years, that at the end thereof they might stand before the king.

6 Now among these were of the children of Judah, Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah:

7 Unto whom the prince of the eunuchs gave names: for he gave unto Daniel the name of Belteshazzar; and to Hananiah, of Shadrach; and to Mishael, of Meshach; and to Azariah, of Abednego.

8 ¶ But Daniel purposed in his heart that he would not defile himself with the portion of the king’s meat, nor with the wine which he drank: therefore he requested of the prince of the eunuchs that he might not defile himself.

Da 1:12 Prove thy servants, I beseech thee, ten days; and let them give us pulse to eat, and water to drink.

13 Then let our countenances be looked upon before thee, and the countenance of the children that eat of the portion of the king’s meat: and as thou seest, deal with thy servants.

14 So he consented to them in this matter, and proved them ten days.

15 And at the end of ten days their countenances appeared fairer and fatter in flesh than all the children which did eat the portion of the king’s meat.

16 Thus Melzar took away the portion of their meat, and the wine that they should drink; and gave them pulse.

Mmm-mmm-love that “pulse”. (Actually translated as grain.)

What have we done with this?

We have taken the food God created, and replaced it with ersatz food, fake food. Some packages you read have no real food items in them. God gave us the intelligence to do this. He also gave us the intelligence to realize that this is harmful. If we know something is harmful and we do it anyway, what are we saying to the One who created us.

Ro 1:25 Who changed the truth of God into a lie, and worshipped and served the creature more than the Creator, who is blessed for ever. Amen.

Ro 1:23 And changed the glory of the uncorruptible God into an image made like to corruptible man, and to birds, and fourfooted beasts, and creeping things.

1Co 6:19 What? know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost which is in you, which ye have of God, and ye are not your own?

1Co 6:20 For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God’s.

What is the purpose of the food you eat?

Yes, there is a social aspect, and food is tied to culture and emotion. But foods primary purpose is to nourish our bodies, to give us strength and health. If your food isn’t doing that, try doing it God’s way. All the most popular diets that work come back to the same principles- eat real, whole food. Eat lots of vegetables, some fruit and grain, less of milk and meat. If you truly hate vegetables, try some of the smoothie recipes out there. Grind them up and add them to your meatloaf, add more to your soups, or casseroles. Choose foods based on their health benefits

If you are at the doctor’s office, and he is saying: 1. You need to lose weight. 2. Your blood pressure is too high. 3. You have type II diabetes. 4. You have metabolic syndrome. 5. You suffer from constipation or other bowel issues, maybe it’s time to reevaluate what you are eating and why. Look at all the plants God put on this earth, and try to fit more of them into your diet, without smothering them in oil, or deep fat frying them. Do you have trouble with heart burn? How many food related medicines are you taking?

Php 3:19 Whose end is destruction, whose god is the stomach, and whose glory is in their shame, whose minds are fixed on the things of the earth.

If taste is the overriding factor in your choices, ignoring the health effects of those choices, maybe it’s time to ask “Is this really how God wants me to live?”

BTW, the answer to the question “Does God care what we eat?” is yes and no. Yes, he wants us to treat our bodies with respect, and eat the food he gave us. No:

Mt 6:25 ¶ Therefore I say unto you, Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor yet for your body, what ye shall put on. Is not the life more than meat, and the body than raiment?
Lu 12:22 ¶ And he said unto his disciples, Therefore I say unto you, Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat; neither for the body, what ye shall put on.

Two Recipes for your Health

I’m not a foodie, but I do have my moments. I made two recipes today to use lots of veggies since I have a garden, belong to a community garden and belong to a C.S.A. To explain, a C.S.A. is Community Supported Agriculture- you buy a share from a farm at the beginning of the summer, and you get a share of whatever is produced throughout the summer. Anyway, I have LOTS of veggies in the house, and part of our goal with our community garden is to encourage our church members to eat healthier, since the garden is a church activity, so I came up with some recipes that I thought everyone would like. Eating lots of veggies is the BEST way to stay healthy. While people can argue the point, I see a strong correlation between taking care of your physical body and taking care of your spirit. I also make a “kale slaw”, but that is just cole slaw with kale substituted for the cabbage. I didn’t have enough after the pot luck to bring any home, so I guess it was successful.

So, I thought I would share the two recipes to help others enjoy their veggies.

Americanized Tabbouleh western version of a middle eastern salad

I changed it to use all the kale I have:

3-4 kale leaves, finely chopped
1 c. Bulgar wheat, prepared
1-T. lemon juice
1t. lime juice (optional)
¼  of an onion, chopped
1 cucumber peeled and chopped
1 c. cherry tomatoes, cut in half
2T. Italian dressing
1-4T. chopped fresh mint
Mix and chill

All amounts are approximate, I don’t measure things, I go by look and taste.
Now, this second is based on a possible memory, I thought I had heard of something like this, but couldn’t find any recipe, so I just “winged it”. It turned out fantastic.

Beet slaw

beet salad

pretty too!

1 peeled shredded beet
6 or so baby carrots
a few splashes of balsamic vinegar
a dab of  molasses
a dab of strawberry jam
a good squirt or two of olive oil mayonnaise
a handful of dried cranberries
I wasn’t sure what raw beets would be like, but it was really, really good. I had a carrot salad that was a bit sweet with raisins at a restaurant the other day, giving me the idea of what to put in.

I’m Not a Food Blogger

So, I’m never going to be a food blogger, but I have been thinking a lot about how to get people to understand that eating well doesn’t have to be expensive or terribly time consuming. I think it is clear that cooking your own food is the best way to avoid the bad things in our diets. However, it requires more time and thought to do so, and we all get busy, tired or lazy at times.  I’ve come up with ways to make it easier.  I will just give you this entry as a series of ideas, and if more come to me, I’ll make it a regular feature.

First, make friends with your microwave:

  1.  Not only is it fast, it lets vegetable keep much of their nutritional value. I take a regular cereal bowl, dump some fresh or frozen veggies in, put a plate on top and pop it in. 2-3 minutes for fresh, 4-5 for frozen. If your husband talked you into pizza, cut a slice in half, microwave some broccoli, onion and green pepper, drop it on the pizza. Half the calories, twice the nutrition and yummy.
  2. Bake a sweet potato in the microwave. More fiber and vitamins than a white potato, one can usually feed 2-3 people, takes only 5 minutes and retains more moisture.
  3. Eggs take only 25-30 seconds in the microwave. You have to watch them. Coat a bowl with spray oil, crack an egg in and cook on high.
  4. You can cook corn meal, which is what Polenta is, easily in the microwave. I cook a cup of water on high for a minute, add 1/4 c. of corn meal, a dash of salt, microwave on high one minute, stir, cook and stir like that until it is the consistency you like.  Put the aforementioned egg on top, salsa and/ or cheese and you have a 5 minute lunch.
  5. You want a really sweet treat, that’s healthier? Peel a banana, cut in half length wise. Put in a bowl or plate, cut side up. Arrange chocolate chips and mini marshmallows down each side. Microwave just till the chips melt and the ‘mallows puff up. It makes the banana sooo much sweeter, it’s almost too much.
  6. Make your own yogurt. I got a yogurt maker for Christmas, and it says to bring the milk to a boil for thicker yogurt. It is so much easier to do so in the microwave. No scorching, and as long as you keep an eye on it, no boiling over. About 10 minutes for a quart of milk.

These are just my microwave thoughts. Next I’ll do an article on some super quick dinner ideas. After that, some ways to make the healthiest choices easier.

Every Little Bit.

Last night we had a delicious meal. Roasted vegetables, meatloaf and cole slaw. It made me think of two more weight loss tips that might help if that is your goal. As you can see, it was two vegetables and a meat. There is some starch, there were two potatoes in the veggies and some stuffing in the meatloaf, but no bread, an extra potato, or pasta.  That can be an effective and painless way to cut calories. Don’t serve any form of starch in addition to the meal. Don’t put crackers with the soup, bread on the side, bread sticks or any other form of bread. Most of the time, these sorts of additions are adding calories to an already complete meal. Starches also raise your blood sugar quickly.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not a bread hater. I won’t ever go “paleo”. If you don’t know what that means, “paleo” is the diet philosophy that we shouldn’t eat anything our paleolithic ancesters wouldn’t eat. Read- pre-agriculture. In any case, eat bread and starch  if it is intrinsic to the meal,  as a sandwich, noodle soup, spaghetti and meatballs. Just don’t add it to an already complete meal.

The other idea contained in that meal is two veggies, less of everything else. It is very hard to gain weight, eating mostly vegetables. I even added veggies to the meatloaf, onions and green pepper.

I hope this helps. I also hope that picture makes everyone want to go out and roast some veggies- 400+ degree oven, enough olive oil to coat, salt, pepper, rosemary, garlic. Roast until they look delicious-20-45 minutes, depending on your oven, how much veggies, how big the pieces, etc.

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: